New Release from “The Wealth Club” w/ commentary by Figgy

Disclaimer

The opinions, recommendations, and comments expressed in the following post are solely those of the artists’ and subjects quoted.  They do not represent the position of ShutYaMouthAndCallMeUgly.com.  This site does not endorse the expletives used in the song nor do we necessarily share the intended outlook of the artists.  However, it is our estimation that art (no matter what form) should be celebrated and never calibrated. As always we request the feedback of the ShutYaMouthAndCallMeUgly.com family and we encourage you to engage with the artists’.

“The Nike Strike” ft History [Prod By. Dre Dollasz]

Nike Strike

Nike Strike

 

 

 

 

 

 

To listen to the new release click here ——> The Nike Strike

If you read the feature we did on The Wealth Club in July 2012, you may have noticed a drastic difference in content and delivery.   I asked Figgy for a brief commentary on the song so that we may clear up any misunderstandings or presumptions.

SYMACMU: We all know there’s been controversy revolved around the low wages and working conditions in overseas Nike shoe factories. Is that all that inspired this song and the accompanying cover art?

FIGGY: Well actually, The Nike Strike is a metaphor for a break from the norm. Our culture becomes so infatuated with what’s in and what’s trendy that we forget to set the trends. You take a ride on any form of public transportation and you’re bound to find teenagers rockin’ the latest Nikes or Jordan’s, or some other fashion that someone told them was fly. The fact that Nike takes part in the overseas underworld of menial labor only attests to the fact that we don’t even know what we’re doing. I made the song to let people know that the only person that benefits from the 300 dollars spent on these sneakers is Michael Jordan himself. I want to encourage people to think for themselves and not be subject to believing the things they are told.

SYMACMU: The closing of the song says, “Art over commerce.”  A synonym for commerce is trade.  Some may argue, commerce strengthens our international social relations.  As with many revolutions, we historically coin phrases that are catchy or attention grabbing.  Is it safe to assume that you are attacking the art of fashion and accusing major brands of being trendy rather than authentic?

FIGGY: Art over Commerce is the title of my series’ of mixtapes. The theme Art over Commerce focuses around the idea of art being more important than the monetary gain. Obviously the point of making a career out of being an artist would be to ultimately make money, but at what cost? Too often we see hiphop artists portray an on-screen facade to make themselves relevant or to “come up”. Hip hop is based around the premise of honest expression. How can we call ourselves hip hop artists or be part of the hip hop generation if we aren’t willing to stay true to its origins?

SYMACMU:  Do you consider yourselves “conscious rappers”?

FIGGY: We aren’t conscious rappers. We find inspiration in our everyday lives and what’s important to us and we speak on it. I don’t like to categorize us at all. The categorization places limits on the directions that we can go. Basically we do what feels right.

SYMACMU: The majority of my readers are females.  This particular track is laced with profanity including the word bitch.  Traditional and contemporary feminists have fought against the common use of this word almost as much as Black educators and neo-revolutionaries have fought against the word Nigger.  How do you defend the use of the words bitch and nigger in this song?

FIGGY: I have a deep respect for the power of language. I feel as if the context gives the word a situational meaning. For example, women call each other bitches all the time and it’s okay because within the context, the word bitch becomes a term of endearment. But if I were to call a woman a bitch it would be a blatant sign of disrespect. On the other side of the spectrum I also believe in calling a spade a spade. Although we’re blessed to have many respectable upstanding beautiful women making their way in life, we also have the bottom of the totem pole bitches and that’s fact. As for the word nigger, I think it affects you as much as you let it. I look at the transition of the word as a mark of our progression. We have taken a word that was used to demean and terrorize our people and alienated the people responsible from using it. I know many people would disagree and state that we should rid ourselves of the word all along which I don’t any problem in doing,  but while it’s being used I say we keep it to ourselves.

-Shaun Nickens

It wasn’t all bullsh*t!

When I was a child my Nana Bea would call me princess. princess My chariot was her white mini van and my ball was a shopping spree at Syms Clothing, lunch at Old Country Buffet, and a Tweety chain I picked out at a discount jewelry store. In my neighborhood there were no gowns, just Reebok, Kani, Tommy Hilfiger, Nautica, Mecca, and Calvin Klein. If you had a Bear bubble jacket in the winter, you were “cool.” That’s what hood princesses wore . My maternal side would spoil me with name brands from QVC that I was too young to appreciate and I had a standing hair appointment every two weeks. I didn’t know what a luxury that was. There was a manicure specialist named Jackie who did my tiny 6-year- old nails while my hair would dry. My friends wanted to eat at my house.  They’d call home and ask for permission. I didn’t know what a  luxury that was. To have enough food to feed
your family and feed unexpected guests.

You’re never told your Prince isn’t going to fight dragons or “save” you from anything. Relationships require effort and gumption from both parties!
You’re going to win each other. You’re both royal in your own right. You have to be honest with yourself and be willing to admit your flaws so they don’t devour you. You’re as vulnerable to your demons as a ditz is to a poison apple.  My favorite Disney princess was Ariel. Long red hair. A body Jennifer Hudson would kill for so she can keep making money off her weight lossariel commercials. A mermaid with a talking Jamaican crab as an advisor. I didn’t understand how she could be late all the time when she swam so fast. Id always be on time. No car, no traffic, no stopping for gasoline? Perfect! I could relate to Ariel. She was a dreamer who just wanted something different from her norm. She’s never been on land. I’ve never seen blue or clear water. The only waters I know are long island beaches and chlorinated pools. She dreamt of love. I’ve always been fascinated with love.  The only emotion left inexplicable and undefined. I sought it out and have found it and claim it with raw passion and loyalty. She traded in her fins, her friends, and her father for it! She won a mans heart without speaking (I realize now that being mute worked tremendously in her favor.) Ariel bridged the gap for me. The gap between the fairy tales I watched over and over on VHS and real life in Jamaica Queens. Those stories and movies aren’t all bullsh*t.

The bottom line was sacrifice, not allowing fear to hold you at ransom, not allowing your enemies to underestimate you, respecting your parents but choosing to be emancipated from the mistakes they made that they are convinced you’ll repeat. Being a princess wasn’t about a diamond studded crown or my Yankee fitted. It’s about GUTS and the clarity of self to recognize your royal position no matter what your socio-economic status is. You’re royal even of your man has to let down his cornrows and YOU have to climb a tower to get to his heart. The throne is within. So dust off your old
FUBU sweat suit and tell the non believers ShutYaMouthAndCallMeUgly.fubu

-Shaun Nickens